Provincial

Vancouver dog walker pleads guilty

Emma Paulsen . . . sentenced on January 21

A Vancouver dog walker, who first reported six dogs had been stolen from her vehicle but then said that the dogs died of heat exhaustion, pleaded guilty to two charges — animal cruelty and mischief.

Emma Paulsen was charged with six counts before admitting that she lied about what happened in May when Paulsen left the animals in her truck at a Langley dog park.

The dogs died of heat exhaustion. Paulsen originally said she left her vehicle to use the washroom at a Langley dog park, and when she returned the dogs were gone.

Nominate your favourite small business for BC awards

Nominate your favourite small business for BC awards

Small business owners have the opportunity to be recognized as one of BC’s top entrepreneurs for their contribution to their local community and to the global economy as part of the Small Business BC Awards.

The Small Business BC Awards celebrate the top small businesses and rising stars across British Columbia. With ten diverse award categories this year, there’s one suited for every entrepreneur – whether they own a company operating for over 15 years or they’re still creating a business plan.

Surrey school locked down after domestic incident involving weapon

Surrey school locked down after domestic incident involving weapon

At approximately 8:30 this morning, the Surrey RCMP attended Royal Heights Elementary  in response to a domestic assault incident which occurred outside the school.

New wood stove exchange program benefits communities

The province is hopeful up to 630 stoves can be exchanged  this coming year. — The Nelson Daily photo

The Province is providing $190,000 to communities throughout British Columbia to encourage residents to replace their old wood stoves with cleaner burning models.

Together thirteen communities/regional districts are receiving funding from the Ministry of Environment through the Wood Stove Exchange Program.

The goal is to have close to 630 stoves exchanged across the province this coming year.

"Many families throughout B.C. heat their homes with a wood stove or fireplace," said Mary Polak, Minister of Environment.

Province recognizes apprenticeship programs

Province recognizes apprenticeship programs

The provincial government has proclaimed Friday (November 7), as B.C.’s inaugural “Apprenticeship Recognition Day” to help raise awareness of the importance of developing a highly trained and skilled workforce for key sectors of B.C.’s growing economy where skilled trades are needed.

The Proclamation was officially announced today in the British Columbia Legislature and marks Apprenticeship Recognition Day as an on-going annual event to recognize the value of B.C. apprentices and the employers who hire, train and mentor them.

Government announces grant for seniors’ falls prevention and mobility

Government announces grant for seniors’ falls prevention and mobility

In recognition of Seniors’ Fall Prevention Awareness Week, Health Minister Terry Lake announced a $4.5-million grant through the Provincial Health Services Authority to the Centre for Hip Health and Mobility for programs to help prevent falls and hip fractures in older adults and enhance mobility though early intervention.

“Preventing falls for seniors can have a huge impact on how they are able to go about their day-to-day activities and maintain their overall health,” said Lake.

Know the signs: help prevent violence against B.C. women

Know the signs: help prevent violence against B.C. women

Nearly seven in 10 Canadians have known a woman who has experienced physical or sexual abuse.

As part of Crime Prevention Week (November 1-7), the BC Government wants to help ensure British Columbians know the signs of violence against women and how they can help.

Violence against women happens in all cultures, religions, and ethnic communities, at every age, and in every income group. Violence against women can include:

Police warn southern interior drivers of challenging road conditions

When snow arrives, and it will eventually, reduce speed.

As the temperature drops and conditions get darker, ICBC and police are warning drivers to be prepared for the challenges of driving in the fall and winter in the Southern Interior and adjust their driving to the road conditions they encounter.

Every October, there is an average of 26 crashes resulting in injuries or death due to driving too fast for the conditions in the Southern Interior.

That number more than triples to 97 in December as driving conditions worsen.

The pitfalls of getting an extra hour of sleep — end of Daylight Savings Time

The pitfalls of getting an extra hour of sleep — end of Daylight Savings Time

The end of daylight savings time occurs Sunday morning at 2 a.m., which means an extra hour of sleep for most of the country — except for Fort St. John, Charlie Lake, Taylor and Dawson Creek and Creston in B.C. and all but a few places in Saskatchewan.

However, according to Insurance Corporation of BC (ICBC) the next two weeks are critical for drivers.

ICBC has said 16 per cent increase in the average number of crashes in B.C. during the late afternoon commute in the two weeks following the end of Daylight Savings Time compared to the two weeks prior to the change.

COMMENT: Canada's capital gains taxes hurt economy, reform could liberate 'locked-in' capital

COMMENT: Canada's capital gains taxes hurt economy, reform could liberate 'locked-in' capital

The Fraser Institute

Capital gains taxes stifle investment, discourage entrepreneurship, and damage Canada’s economy, notes a new essay released today by the Fraser Institute, an independent, non-partisan Canadian public policy think-tank.

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