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Heat Warning continues for Boundary

The 36 C heat has forced Environment Canada to continue a Heat Warning for the Boundary Region, at least into Wednesday.

Temperatures in the Boundary are expected to continue into Wednesday before cooling a few degrees Environment Canada said.

The 36 C heat has forced Environment Canada to continue a Heat Warning for the Boundary Region, at least into Wednesday.

“A prolonged stretch of well above normal temperatures is continuing across the southern interior as a ridge of high pressure remains anchored offshore,” Environment Canada said. “This period of hot weather will end with gradual cooling on Wednesday except for Boundary and Kootenay Lake regions which will likely see an extra day of heat.”

Environment and Climate Change Canada, in conjunction with Medical Health Officials, have issued this alert due to the persistent high daytime temperatures, warm overnight low temperatures and the extended duration of this warm period.

Environment and Climate Change Canada and Medical Health Officers are reminding people to take precautions to protect themselves from the heat, including:

- Stay hydrated by drinking cold beverages, preferably water.
- Spend time in an air-conditioned facility for at least several hours every day.
- Avoid sunburn by staying in the shade and using sunscreen with SPF 30 or more.
- Never leave people or pets in a parked car.

Extreme heat affects everyone.

The risks are greater for young children, pregnant women, older adults, people with chronic illnesses and people working or exercising outdoors.

Watch for the effects of heat illness: swelling, rash, cramps, fainting, heat exhaustion, heat stroke and the worsening of some health conditions.

Get informed
- Check the local news for health and safety updates.
- For more information on heat-related illness, call HealthLinkBC at 811.
- Contact your local government to find out what services (such as air-conditioned buildings and public splash parks) are available in your area.

Environment Canada is also continuing its Special Air Quality Statement for the Boundary as wildfire smoke continues to impact the province.

During a wildfire, smoke conditions can change quickly over short distances and can vary considerably hour-by-hour.

Wildfire smoke is a natural part of our environment but it is important to be mindful that exposure to smoke may affect your health.

People with pre-existing health conditions, the elderly, infants, children and sensitive individuals are more likely to experience health effects from smoke exposure.

The bulletin can be accessed online at: https://www2.gov.bc.ca/gov/content/environment/air-land-water/
air/air-quality/air-advisories

For general information about wildfire smoke and your health, contact HealthLink BC at 8-1-1 (toll free, 24 hours a day, 7 days a week).

Individuals may experience symptoms such as increased coughing, throat irritation, headaches or shortness of breath. Children, seniors, and those with cardiovascular or lung disease, such as asthma, are especially at risk.