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Path into city’s friendship garden next major issue for society

More work has been undertaken into the ever-evolving garden created in the city’s Cottonwood Falls Park since the snow receded earlier this year, but the road to the garden is now the next biggest issue.

New pathways are being made into the city’s Japanese friendship garden.

More work has been undertaken into the ever-evolving garden created in the city’s Cottonwood Falls Park — including work on the Saturday farmers market site — since the snow receded earlier this year, but the road to the garden is now the next biggest issue.

The north gateway into the park — where people traditionally come in off of the parking area — is undergoing a re-design, noted Coun. Keith Page when city council spoke with members of the Nelson Izu-Shi Friendship Society last week.

Although some direction had been provided by city council on improving car facilities in the area, Page looked to the society for further guidance.

“You guys clearly have a very distinct vision, you put a lot of time and effort into how these pieces are thought about,” he said about the friendship garden.

“Are there other ways we can be elevating our design considerations on how that parking will be improved upon that is incorporated into a faithfully representative way … and what we might see of a Japanese garden of this calibre?”

Nelson Izu-Shi Friendship Society president John Armstrong said he was happy for the improvements to the parking area for people coming to Cottonwood.

“But what we are interested in is pathways, and pathways into the park and to gradually introduce people to the fact that they are coming into a park and a Japanese friendship garden,” he told city council.

“I think, in time, you will see an improved entry, especially for pedestrians.”

Armstrong was also looking forward to improved signage so people know where the friendship garden was located, as well as the release of a new brochure.

Garden roots

In 2003 the Friendship Society created the sister city “Friendship Garden” in Cottonwood Falls Park, in order to honour the friendship.

Since that time the Friendship Society has continued to develop and care for the garden area, and has commenced work on broader improvements at Cottonwood Falls Park.

In 2021 city council recognized and honoured the Friendship Society with a Sustainability Leadership Award for its work at the park.

Source: City of Nelson agenda

Another exchange?

Armstrong commented on the annual exchange with Izushi, noting that he has been asked numerous times about the prospect of it happening for the first time since COVID-19 shut it down in 2020.

The next exchange depends on the Japanese government, Armstrong said.

“We can’t just go in as individual travellers, and it depends on the comfort people have with hosting visitors,” he said.

The society is interested in doing it again, Armstrong pointed out.

“Maybe next year (it will happen) but most likely 2024,” he said.