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Provincial News

by Robin Yassin-Kassab on Monday Jan 31 2011

The day the revolution started.

by Contributor on Monday Jan 31 2011

Advertisers will spend more on internet ads in 2010 than newspaper ads for the first time, according to new estimates by eMarketer. Online ad spending will grow 13.9% to $25.8 billion for the full year in 2010, while advertisers are expected to spend just $22.78 billion on print newspaper ads this year, down 8.2% from 2009, eMarketer estimates.

by Contributor on Monday Jan 31 2011

Advertisers will spend more on internet ads in 2010 than newspaper ads for the first time, according to new estimates by eMarketer. Online ad spending will grow 13.9% to $25.8 billion for the full year in 2010, while advertisers are expected to spend just $22.78 billion on print newspaper ads this year, down 8.2% from 2009, eMarketer estimates.

by Contributor on Monday Jan 31 2011

Advertisers will spend more on internet ads in 2010 than newspaper ads for the first time, according to new estimates by eMarketer. Online ad spending will grow 13.9% to $25.8 billion for the full year in 2010, while advertisers are expected to spend just $22.78 billion on print newspaper ads this year, down 8.2% from 2009, eMarketer estimates.

by Nelson Daily Staff on Sunday Jan 30 2011

Hotter summers may not be such a disaster for the Greenland

by Nelson Daily Staff on Sunday Jan 30 2011

Hotter summers may not be such a disaster for the Greenland

by Nelson Daily Staff on Sunday Jan 30 2011

Hotter summers may not be such a disaster for the Greenland

by Robin Yassin-Kassab on Sunday Jan 30 2011

My past experience talking to Egyptians, in Egypt and around the world, is that 95% of them hate Husni Mubarak and the humiliation he’s brought upon their once great country. When I ask of their hopes for change, they answer with the bitter resignation common to all Arabs: “Nothing will change. His son will come after him.

by Robin Yassin-Kassab on Sunday Jan 30 2011

My past experience talking to Egyptians, in Egypt and around the world, is that 95% of them hate Husni Mubarak and the humiliation he’s brought upon their once great country. When I ask of their hopes for change, they answer with the bitter resignation common to all Arabs: “Nothing will change. His son will come after him.

by Robin Yassin-Kassab on Sunday Jan 30 2011

My past experience talking to Egyptians, in Egypt and around the world, is that 95% of them hate Husni Mubarak and the humiliation he’s brought upon their once great country. When I ask of their hopes for change, they answer with the bitter resignation common to all Arabs: “Nothing will change. His son will come after him.

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