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Paddle and learn this summer with Wildsight's youth field school

Contributor
By Contributor
May 3rd, 2023

Submitted by Wildsight

Sixteen youth from across the Columbia Basin have the opportunity to navigate the complex social, economic and natural history of the mighty Columbia River as they paddle its waters this summer. 

Students in Wildsight’s Columbia River Field School canoe through key sections of the Canadian side of the Columbia River, camp on its riverbanks, and learn in an immersive environment through the 15-day course, all while earning credit through a partnership with School District 8, transferable to other school districts in the basin too.

“Not only is this learning in and of itself meaningful, but we’re happy to be working in partnership with School District 8 to offer four credits on course completion,” says Monica Nissen, Wildsight Education Director.

“These credits emphasize the deep curriculum connections found in the field course, and further enriches the experience for youth engaged in the program.”

Field school participants meet with a diverse group of guest speakers including government officials, Indigenous knowledge holders, scientists, artists, and adventurers.

They earn Lakewater Level 1 and Canoe Tripping Paddler certifications, and learn important outdoor skills like reading maps, packing, cooking, setting up camp and leave no trace practices. But most importantly, students gain an appreciation for this watershed and the intricate role we all play in its protection.

“Every single day, it was a big adventure, being in nature and seeing beautiful places around me,” reflects 2022 participant Marie Chevalot.

“Columbia River Field School definitely helped me develop a greater connection to a sense of community and a relationship with nature in this region, and it has helped me find interest in learning more about international treaties, and conservation.”

This year’s CRFS runs July 9–23. For more information and to apply, visit wildsight.ca/fieldschool.

Photo courtesy Bailey Repp

 

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