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OP/ED: MLA says Kootenay jobs at risk

OP/ED: MLA says Kootenay jobs at risk

A secret 10-year deal signed by forest minister Steve Thomson could have significant implications on B.C.’s pulp mills, including Celgar, says New Democrat MLA Katrine Conroy.

“We know that mills are having to pay more to get fiber, and we know that as the timber supply problem gets worse, it’s only going to get harder for mills to get chips,” said Conroy, the MLA for Kootenay-West. “Yet the minister signed a sweetheart deal just before the election that locks a significant amount of wood chips in for export for 10 years.

High demand forces RDCK to issue Stage two water measures

High demand forces RDCK to issue Stage two water measures

The Regional District of Central Kootenay, concerned about the record levels of water demand in the Balfour area, has issued Stage two water conservation measures to residents and businesses.

The measures include allowing residents to water gardens, trees, and shrubs by sprinkling one day per week for a maximum of two hours between 4-7 a.m. and 7 to 10 p.m.

The watering of gardens, trees, and shrubs by hose, spring nozzle, and hand-held container is permitted at any time.

However, washing sidewalks, driveways, vehicles, and outdoor surfaces is not permitted.

BC Coroners urge water safety after four drowning deaths in just five days

BC Coroners urge water safety after four drowning deaths in just five days

With the promise of another sizzling summer weekend ahead, the BC Coroners Service is warning residents and visitors to take extra care when enjoying water-based activities, be it at lakes, rivers, pools or the seashore.

In the past five days (as of Friday), coroners in B.C. have begun investigations into four drowning deaths, reinforcing Coroners Service statistics that show a high percentage of drownings in B.C. occur in the summer months of May through August.

Forty people still missing after train derails in Quebec

Forty people still missing after train derails in Quebec

The Huffington Post

LAC-MEGANTIC, Quebec — About 40 people were still missing a day after a runaway train derailed in Quebec, igniting explosions and fires that destroyed a busy downtown district and killed five people.

Police said a higher death toll was inevitable, and authorities feared the number might soar once they're able to reach the hardest-hit areas. Worries remained over the status of two oil-filled train cars.

Mayor wants to change process for bargaining with police and fire unions

Mayor wants to change process for bargaining with police and fire unions

Nelson City Council will be heading into negotiations with its firefighters and police officers this year, and the mayor thinks the process is biased in favour of the unions.

John Dooley’s opinion is shared by the B.C. Mayors’ Caucus which is calling on the provincial government to change the way negotiating is done with the two groups.

From police bizarre-but-true files

From police bizarre-but-true files

Police received a bizarre call June 27, according to RCMP Cpl. Debbie Postnikoff.

"On June 27 at 6:37 p.m., a complaint was received of an incident that had occurred approximately 20 minutes from Castlegar near the Nancy Greene Junction. A caller reported that there was a male that had been acting strangely inside of the Greyhound bus that they were in and was possibly "high" on a substance," she said, adding the substance could possibly have been paint fumes.

Cyclist struck by van on Columbia, charges pending against driver

Cyclist struck by van on Columbia, charges pending against driver

A Castlegar cyclist was struck by a van on Columbia Avenue yesterday (July 3) according to RCMP Cpl. Debbie Postnikoff.

"(At about 8:15 a.m.), Castlegar RCMP, Fire and EMS were dispatched to a motor vehicle collision involving a cyclist that had been struck by a van," she said. "The van was travelling northbound near the 1700 block of Columbia Avenue when it struck a cyclist, also travelling northbound.

Silviculture boss to community: Take responsibility before it’s too late

WCSA’s executive director John Betts is promoting an plan to "get ahead of the fire." — Photo courtesy Robert Gray, R.W. Gray Consulting Ltd.

By Suzy Hamilton, The Nelson Daily

A plan that is sure to raise eyebrows is being promoted by the Western Canada Silviculture Association (WCSA).

It calls for Nelson gaining control of local forests and managing them for one purpose: to increase the community’s resilience to wildland urban interface fires.

Those are the wildfires that encroach on communities and jeopardize infrastructure, homes and lives. They are predicted to increase as the effects of climate change progress.

COMMENT: This summer protect yourself from the sun...screen?

COMMENT: This summer protect yourself from the sun...screen?

As the days get red hot this summer, so does unprotected skin.  We’re all taught as kids to lather up when hitting the beach or pool, and we’ve all felt the sting of a bad sunburn after not heeding that advice.  Until recently, there haven’t been too many questions asked about what is in the concoction that we that we absorb into our skin to keep us from burning.  Some of the new information out there may have you searching for an alternative method to protect yourself.

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