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Age a factor in Canadian wealth inequality

Age a factor in Canadian wealth inequality

Wealth inequality in Canada is largely the result of differences in people’s age, where wealth accumulation is a slow and steady process over a long period of time, finds a new study released today by the Fraser Institute, an independent, non-partisan Canadian public policy think-tank.

Wealth, measured by a household’s net worth, includes the value of all assets — house, business, stocks, bonds, savings, etc. — minus all debts, such as the mortgage, a line of credit and credit card debt.  It is, of course, different than income.

COLUMN: The moral way to distribute social wealth -- Part One

COLUMN: The moral way to distribute social wealth -- Part One

Capitalists,Liberals, Nationalists, Intellectuals

News about money

We have been treated to the spectacle this month of a half-dozen Bombardier executives planning to split 32 million dollars among themselves as bonuses, at the same time as the corporation has announced it is about to lay off 14, 000 workers worldwide.

It was also announced that the world will officially have its first trillionaire this year. No doubt we already do, we just don’t have his name.

Canada’s personal income tax turns 100

What’s more, when compared to U.S. states, Canadian provinces have seven of the eight highest top combined rates, with Nova Scotia, Ontario, Quebec, New Brunswick, P.E.I. and Manitoba all over 50 per cent. — Fraser Institute image

After 100 years of taxing Canadians, the personal income tax, which began as a small wartime revenue generator, has morphed into a costly, complex behemoth that’s difficult to administer and makes Canada very uncompetitive, finds a new collection of essays by the Fraser Institute, an independent, non-partisan Canadian public policy think-tank.

Caribou, Logging, Wolves and Corporate Donors

Photo by David Moskowitz for DeSmog Canada

What poses the greatest hazard to BC's endangered Southern Mountain Caribou -- habitat loss, wolves, or corporate donors?  Or are all three of those factors linked, and if so, how? This opinion piece is from DeSmog Canada.  Read and contemplate.

New specialty licence plates support charity, non-profit organizations

The expanded program will let even more British Columbians support other worthwhile causes.

Building on the success of the BC Parks licence plates unveiled earlier this year, ICBC is working to expand its specialty plate program to include support for charities and not-for-profit organizations. 

"The response to the BC Parks plates from British Columbians has been tremendous, with more than 14,000 Parks plates sold since the launch at the end of January to help support provincial parks," said Todd Stone, Minister of Transportation and Infrastructure.

Businesses honoured during Chamber Excellence Awards

Savoy owner Jimmy Bundschuh, far right, along with staff thank the Chamber for the award during Thursday's ceremony at the Adventure Hotel. — The Nelson Daily

A handful of local businesses were honoured for some outstanding contributions during the past year at the Chamber of Commerce Business Excellence Awards Thursday at the Adventure Hotel in Nelson.

The awards were part of the Chamber of Commerce Annual General Meeting, which welcomed two new directors to the board — Stephen Harris and former president Cal Renwick.

Returning members to the board include Paul Wiest, Karen Bennett, and Scott Grimshaw and Tanya Finley.

Quebec’s subsidized daycare imposes real costs on taxpayers, limits choice for parents

The study finds that in 2014/15, the provincial government spent $2.6 billion for the program.

Quebec’s subsidized daycare program has produced skyrocketing costs along with worrying child development outcomes without eliminating wait times, finds a new study released today by the Fraser Institute, an independent, non-partisan Canadian public policy think-tank.

The findings are especially important, given the federal government announced in the 2017 budget last week that it wants to create 40,000 subsidized daycare spots across Canada over the next three years.

COLUMN: From the Hill -- 2017 Budget Comments

Member of Parliament Richard Cannings

As I discussed in my last column, the federal government had an opportunity in last week’s budget to finally start closing the growing income inequality gap in Canada. But, unfortunately the Liberals chose tax breaks for wealthy Canadians and giveaways to large corporations over helping the unemployed, veterans, and Indigenous children.

Wanted: more walk, less talk in today’s federal budget

Missed opportunity says Canadian Centre for Policy Alternatives.

The federal government missed a key opportunity to walk the walk and tackle income inequality in today’s federal budget, says Canadian Centre for Policy Alternatives’ Senior Economist David Macdonald.

“While there are some positive aspects to Budget 2017,” Macdonald says, “let’s not mistake this for the bold, visionary inequality reduction budget that Canadians were promised by this government.”

Nelson joins region in cutting red tape by creating mobile business licences

The idea allows small businesses in Nelson to operate in multiple jurisdictions with a single business licence.

The West Kootenay region is on the same page when it comes to small business and reducing red tape.

Several West Kootenay communities — including Nelson — have agreed to participate in the mobile business licence program to streamline and simplify the business licensing process.

The mobile business licence program is part of an effort to promote the success of the small business sector and to reduce barriers to doing business in the province.

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